29th Annual Conference Enduring Materials

- Dance Science Research

- Dance Medicine and Biomechanics

- Dance for Health

30th Annual Conference Enduring Materials 

- Dance for Health

- Dance Medicine

- Dance Research

- Interactive/Movement Sessions

- Dance Science

Accreditation Statement

Enduring CME Materials

MEMBERS ONLY

The IADMS iConference contains enduring materials for those medical professionals seeking CME/CEU credits.  

As part of the IADMS iConference, physicians and allied healthcare professionals can claim CME/CEU credits for eligible enduring materials. iConference is an opportunity for all those involved in the field, or with an interest in the field of dance medicine and science, to connect and discuss recent research and clinical findings that can improve the health outcomes and injury prevention for dancers and through dance practice. Content includes select presentations from our 29th Annual Conference in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and our conference agenda from the 30th Annual Conference.

The IADMS iConference enduring materials are jointly provided by CME Outfitters, LLC, and the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science to provide Category 1 Credits. As such, these enduring materials are available to IADMS membership On-Demand through the IADMS app, available on your mobile device or computer desktop. Members can find the IADMS app password in the Members Area. CME processing fees may be applied. We encourage you to purchase the entire series at the discounted rate (offered through December 31, 2020). 

The Board of Certification (BOC) Category D continuing education credit can be claimed by Certified Athletic Trainers who view the available enduring materials. Contact conference@iadms.org for more information. 

 

Areas of Focus
Our programs incorporate the core competencies developed by the ACCME. The broad subject areas include the following:

-  medical advances in clinical practice

-  medical research and technology

-  quality improvement in everyday clinical practice

-  disparities in injury prevalence, diagnosis and treatment, and access to care

We have developed our course curricula by identifying medical practice gaps along with invited world-renown leaders in the field. Each course is designed to enhance participants’ clinical excellence, competence, and performance and to improve patient outcomes.

iConference: Enduring Materials from IADMS 29th Annual Conference

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

CME/CEU credits: 1.5

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Further Features of Systematic Literature Reviews and Applications to Dance Medicine & Science Current Knowledge: Quality Assessment and Meta-Analysis

Release Date:

July 13, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Manuela Angioi

Aline Noguiera Haas

Claire Hiller

 

Description: Systematic reviews offer a global summary of findings on topics for which a substantial number of prior studies have been reported. Clinicians, health care professionals, and researchers can use systematic reviews to answer questions about dancers’ health, such as treatment interventions, injury diagnosis, and risk factors. Following last year’s forum on essential features of systematic reviews, this interactive forum will focus on two key aspects that may cause confusion when undertaking or assessing a review: a) quality assessment scales and b) meta-analyses. Quality assessments are used to make judgments about the methodological rigor of the studies included in systematic reviews. These scales assess the robustness of study designs to infer the trustworthiness and generalizability of the results. Several validated quality assessment scales are available, and these should be carefully selected according to the design of the studies that are included in systematic reviews. A meta-analysis is the use of statistical techniques to combine and summarize data across several studies. A clear understanding of whether it is appropriate to include a meta-analysis in a systematic review, which data can or should be aggregated and how, how to correctly report the results, will be covered. Through an interactive forum, the Research Committee will introduce the key features of systematic review methodology which will enable the audience to critically engage with current knowledge of a systematic review with meta-analysis. The specific objectives are to: Understand how the use of quality assessment scales provide an objective evaluation of the quality of studies; understand the key features of a meta-analysis and producing a global summary of what the collection of findings recommends. The forum will conclude ample time for discussion and questions with the audience. Attendees can expect to leave with a better understanding of these two features of systematic review design, the pros and cons, and how the results can inform evidence-based practice and answer dance-related clinical questions.

 


Gender Separation in Training: Right or Wrong?

Release Date:

July 13, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Elizabeth Yutzey, MFA

 

Description: In recent years, the social environment is seeing a trend towards increased acceptance of transgender and non-binary identities, which has raised questions about the continuing relevance of gendered technique classes. It is important to continuously review teaching and training methods and be conversant with the latest research in order to provide the healthiest and most productive training environment for young dancers. Purpose: The purpose of the present report is to summarise the literature that has been published since 2006 in relation to the biopsychosocial differences between training young males and females and offer recommendations for training. Methods: A literature search was conducted, examining sources from dance, sport and exercise science, and health and education in relation to the physiological, biological, psychological, and social factors of training young dancers. Results and Conclusion: The biological and physiological factors including puberty and motor skill proficiency, psychological factors including body-related concerns and class composition preference, and the overall social climate point to opposing solutions to the question of training dancers in single-sex classes or coeducationally. Future research is needed to more fully understand the influence of these factors during adolescence and clarify the most effective and most supportive method of training young dancers, including those who identify as transgender or non-binary, in contemporary dance. Although a definitive conclusion regarding coeducational versus single-sex contemporary dance classes has not yet been found, this review highlights the complexity of this topic and suggests careful consideration of the biological, psychological, and social factors when structuring contemporary dance training for young dancers.

 


Stress, Coping, and Psychological Skills of Conservatoire Dance Students: Evaluating Psychological Wellbeing in Practice

Release Date:

July 13, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Liliana Araujo, PhD, CPsychol

 

Description: The psychological challenges of a career in the performing arts can be experienced early during specialist education. Research shows high levels of anxiety, stress, and poor use of coping skills among dancers. Existing curricula in dance education has increasingly included psychological well-being, yet its impact on the well-being experiences of dance students remains under-investigated. This study explores the potential impact of psychological skills training on experiences of well-being among dance students, as well as on their own practice. 


The Validity of Inertial Measurement Units in 3-D Lower Body Analysis of Classical Ballet Movements

Release Date:

July 13, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Rachel Ward, PhD

 

Description: This study aimed to determine the validity of inertial measurement units (IMU), compared to optical motion capture, to accurately record joint angle kinematics during classical ballet movements, in both parallel and turnout orientations. 

 


*Credit Designation Statement - CME Outfitters, LLC designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Length: 1 hour 45 minutes

CME/CEU credits: 1.75

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Biomechanical Determinants of Partner Selection in Sport Ballroom Dancing Couples

Release Date:

July 20, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Adrianna Banio, PhD

 

Description: The selection of partners in sport ballroom dancing is a significant determinant of success in dance competitions. Although the rules do not specify any constraints, judges tend to discriminate against couples with morphological disproportions despite their coordinative abilities and technical skills being at a similar level. Nowadays the choice of a partner is intuitive. If sport dancing would like to be treated seriously as a sport discipline, we cannot only assume and base such decisions on intuition. It is necessary to take decisions regarding partnerships consciously and reasonably based on technology which comes out of a real understanding of the meaning of scientifically verifiable knowledge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of relationship between the somatic build of athletes as well as the level of coordinative abilities and the length of dance partnership in a particular couple and also the influence of these factors on choosing the co-partner in class S pairs. The objective was to define the extent of these factors which should be considered when choosing a partner in the highest level of sports advancement in ballroom dancing. 

 


Burden of Musculoskeletal Injuries in Pre-Professional Ballet Dancers: A 3-year Prospective Cohort Study

Release Date:

July 20, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Sarah Kenny, PhD

 

Description: The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence, incidence, and severity of self- reported musculoskeletal injury in pre-professional ballet dancers across three years of full-time training. Methods: Dancers enrolled in full-time training at a vocational ballet school were recruited at the start of three training seasons: 2015, 2016, 2017. Weekly health problems and hours of dance exposure were self-reported via online questionnaire [modified Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre Questionnaire (OSTRC) on Health Problems]. Three definitions of injury were operationalized: time-loss, medical attention, any physical complaint. Seasonal injury prevalence (the number of participants reporting at least one injury divided by the total number of participants at risk), injury incidence (the total number of new injuries per 1000 hours of dance exposure), and injury severity (reported days lost) were estimated for each definition and year of training.

 


Managing Concussion Symptoms: Myths, Science, Consensus, and Practical Strategies

Release Date:

July 20, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Lynda Manwaring, PhD

 

Description: Concussion management continues to evolve and is guided by the Berlin Consensus Statement1 which identifies guidelines for the management of sport-related concussion. Activity, rather than complete rest, has emerged as an integral component, and best practice for recovery. Guidelines for returning to dance activities post-concussion have been suggested 2 but practical strategies to facilitate recovery for concussed individuals in general, and dancers specifically, have not been identified. Drawing on science, expert knowledge, clinical practice, and practitioner wisdom related to concussion and musculoskeletal injury management, performance psychology, and neuromotor rehabilitation practices, this interactive forum aims to address gaps in current knowledge and practice. The purpose of this study is to report on current relevant empirical evidence on concussion management and describe strategies to facilitate recovery from concussion in dancers. 

 


Hip Joint Cartilage Defects in Professional Ballet Dancers: A 5-Year Longitudinal Study

Release Date:

July 20, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Sue Mayes, PhD, B.App.Sci 

 

Description: The psychological challenges of a career in the performing arts can be experienced early during specialist education. Research shows high levels of anxiety, stress, and poor use of coping skills among dancers. Existing curricula in dance education has increasingly included psychological wellbeing, yet its impact on wellbeing experiences of dance students remains under-investigated. This study explores the potential impact of psychological skills training on experiences of wellbeing among dance students, as well as on their own dance practice.

 


Musculoskeletal Injuries in Pole Dancers: A Prospective Surveillance Study

Release Date:

July 20, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Joanna Nicholas, PhD BSc

 

Description: The purpose of this study is to quantify musculoskeletal injury incidence, the most frequently injured anatomical sites, types, and mechanisms of injury in pole dancing. 

 


Spine Interventions for the Young In-Season Athlete

Release Date:

July 20, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Mohan Radhakrishna, MD

 

Description: This presentation will discuss spinal interventions applicable to common causes of pain in dancers. Spondylolysis is the most common cause of low back pain amenable to spinal interventions. Options include pars blocks, facet blocks, and medial branch blocks. The utility of these will be discussed. Radicular pain however requires a different approach and the transforaminal technique for access to the epidural space will be reviewed. At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to describe applicable interventional spinal techniques along with contraindications and adverse effects.

 


The Effect of Fatigue on Hip and Knee Landing Kinematics in Dancers

Release Date:

July 20, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Danielle Jarvis, PhD, ATC

 

Description: Dancers use mechanical manipulation of the body to convey a detailed story in an aesthetic manner. In doing so, both acute and chronic fatigue as a result of countless rehearsals and performances are to be expected. During landing, in particular, joints of the lower extremity are constantly loaded which may result in adverse kinetic and kinematic outcomes. There is very limited dance research looking at lower extremity kinematics in conjunction with fatigue, and even more limited research offering insight into dance specific fatigue protocols. The purpose of this study was to compare sauté landings both before and after fatigue in 21 experienced female dancers. 

 


*Credit Designation Statement - CME Outfitters, LLC designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Length: 1 hour 45 minutes

CME/CEU credits: 1.75

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Brain Research of Dance: Preparation, Analysis, and Application

Release Date:

July 27, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Hanna Poikonen, PhD, MSc

 

Description: Ecological validity is becoming more and more popular in neuroscientific research. Creative fields such as music, cinema, and dance are getting an important position when approaching the brain in its natural “real-world-like” state. Neuroscience of music and visual arts have a history expanding over decades. However, the performance art, most importantly dance, is a relatively new field in neuroscience. Traditional dance studies in neuroscience investigated simple ballet or ballroom steps seeing dance as “movement with music.” However, contemporary understanding of dance is much wider, highlighting elements such as introspection, instant creation, and embodied collaboration. The elements of movement, music, creation, and collaboration are crucial, especially when taking brain research out of well-isolated laboratories. EEG and fNIRS are methods with the most potential for studying the brain outside of conventional laboratories. Studying the brain in dance outside of the laboratory can focus on the spectator’s experience as an individual or collective with the conventional EEG recording, on the performer’s experience with the mobile EEG recording, or on the combination of these two. When preparing a neuroscientific study in dance, the following points are important to consider: 1) the style of dance, 2) the modality and type of conditions compared, and 3) the length of stimuli. When analyzing the neuroscientific data of dance, it is crucial to consider the following: 1) source analysis and/or sensory analysis, 2) ERP and/or synchrony analysis, 3) p-value oriented or more descriptive statistical analysis. When applying EEG in dance, the field of application should be chosen carefully, focusing on one of the following: 1) Dance for Health, 2) Dance/movement therapy (DMT), 3) dance education, 4) transfer effects of dance. As contemplated above, dance as an artistic entity has a huge potential. To develop the neuroscientific dance research in a direction in which it will be elevated to one of the important branches of neuroscience, we need to create coherence in the research procedure. Thus, discussion about the different ways of running a dance experiment, analyzing the data, and applying the methods is crucial.

 


Dance for Health: A Ten-Year Program of Work

Release Date:

July 27, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Emma Redding, PhD, MSc

 

Description: Dance, as physical activity and a creative art form, can make a vital contribution to the healthy- living agenda. It has the capacity to provide an active, non-competitive form of exercise that can positively affect physical health and psychological wellbeing across different populations. Dance functions in numerous ways: serving as a vital tool in encouraging young people into physical activity, by combating social exclusion and by maintaining levels of physical activity among the elderly. While the value of dance is understood to all those who participate, there is a lack of hard evidence to substantiate this view. Over the last ten years, one of the leading dance conservatories in the UK has developed a program of dance for a wide range of participants including older adults, young people, individuals with physical and learning disabilities and their caregivers, those at risk of low resilience or obesity, patients in hospitals and those with acquired brain injuries. The objective of these projects has been to deliver high-quality creative dance to improve the participants’ health and wellbeing. There are three key features of our work. First, creative dance is at the heart of every project and we explore how creativity affects participant autonomy, agency, and identity. Secondly, research questions and methodologies are derived from the experiences and wisdom of the participants and practitioners themselves, warranting both scientific methods and more creative ways of building evidence. Thirdly, the evolving notion of well-being is appraised in light of developments in health and well-being literature and revised models of evaluation. Our results, which include statistically significant findings, have shown that dance improves physical, mental, and social health. New and important research questions and methods of capturing the value of dance on health and wellbeing are now emerging and the outcomes of our work have informed curricula, been published in academic journals, and served as models of practice across the dance sector. This presentation will share findings from this work for the first time and discuss the challenges and insights from our ten years of work.

 


Movement for Multiple Sclerosis: A Multi-Site Partnership for Practice and Research

Release Date:

July 27, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Elizabeth Johnson, MFA, BFA

 

Description: While dance programs for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have been developed throughout the world over the past two decades, dance programs for people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are just beginning to emerge. This presentation introduces three program models and the multi-site partnership that has been developed between these programs. Methods: Program leaders from two leading Research One universities (including various medical departments and related centers) and an international ballet company came together in Washington, DC in October 2018 to share program models, promising practices and challenges, and to develop a partnership designed to serve as a basis for the development of best practices, pedagogies, and multi-site research. Results: Collaborators qualitatively examined the program models and results of a pilot study conducted at one of the university hospitals. Discussion: Thus far, each program has developed movement practices in their respective communities incorporating synergies from the meeting, information from collaboration with clinical providers, and using other movement programs as a foundation. Conclusion: The preliminary qualitative feedback is promising and reveals the potential to develop a dance framework that can positively improve the symptoms and neurological deficits for people with MS.

 

*Credit Designation Statement: CME Outfitters, LLC designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

iConference: Enduring Materials from IADMS 30th Annual Conference

Length: 2 hours 10 minutes

CME/CEU credits: 2.25

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Deconstructing mental health and addictions in dancers

Release Date:

September 21, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Guest Speaker: Antonio Ocana MD

Epiphany360, Marina del Ray, CA, United States

 

Description: Background: Dance is a healthy expression of physical fitness, musicality and inspiration. Yet its exacting nature can lead to challenges in dancer wellness, self-care and mental health. The current literature suggests that these challenges are more common in dancers, especially ballet dancer. However, data to establish true prevalence rates is sparse. Digital health technology could make the collection of categorical and narrative data more efficient by an order of magnitude. Purpose: The objective of this presentation is 1) to show the neurobiological linkages between childhood adversity, mood disorders, substance use, eating disorders and dance injuries 2) to suggest a range of possible management options. 

 


Autonomy, collaboration, creativity, and dignity: evaluating a three-year dance for dementia programme

Release Date:

September 21, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Bethany Whiteside MSc, PhD1, Lisa Sinclair MA2

1Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; 2Scottish Ballet, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom

 

Description: An evaluation was carried out on a three-year dance for dementia programme (2017-2020) led by an international ballet company. Data was collected through mixed methods over an 18-month period with a dual aim: a) to explore the model of practice developed; b) understand the social and emotional experiences of all groups of participants. The framework guiding the evaluation approach (methods drew on, means of communication, etc.) comprised of four themes–autonomy, collaboration, creativity, and dignity–and reflected the dancer-centered nature of the programme.

 


Dance and music engagement affects health outcomes in older adults: A randomized controlled trial

Release Date:

September 21, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Jatin Ambegaonkar PhD, ATC1, Holly Matto PhD2, Emily Ihara PhD2, Catherine Tompkins PhD2, Nelson Cortes PhD1, Sarah Coogan MS1, Shane Caswell MS1, Victoria FauntroyBS1, Elizabeth Glass MS3, Judy Lee MEd3, Gwen Baraniecki Zwil MSc3, Rick Davis3, Niyati Dhokai PhD3

1Sports Medicine Assessment, Research, and Testing (SMART) Laboratory, George Mason University, Manassas, VA, United States; 2Department of Social Work, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, United States; 3Hylton Performing Arts Center, George Mason University, Manassas, Virginia, United States

 

Description: Engaging in the arts reportedly improves health outcomes. However, how these factors influence health outcomes in community-dwelling older adults(>65 years) remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this randomized‐controlled‐trial was to examine how taking part in different arts(dance & music), compared to control(active social conversation) affects older adults' psychological and physical health and overall quality of life outcomes.

 


Dance and Parkinson’s: the effects on girdle dissociation during the turning movement

Release Date:

September 21, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Aline Hass PhD1, Marlene Brito Fortes BA2, Fruzsina Nagy BSc2, Marcela dos Santos Delabary MSc1, Leonardo Alexandre Peyré-Tartaruga PhD1, Tina Smith PhD2, Yiannis Koutedakis PhD2, Matthew Wyon PhD2

1Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 2University of Wolverhampton, Wasall, United Kingdom

 

Description: The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of dance in Parkinson’s on girdle dissociation during the 180°turning movement.

 


Effects of dance and Nordic Walking program on strength and flexibility in Parkinson’s disease

Release Date:

September 21, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Aline Haas PhD1, Rebeca Gimenes Donida MSc1, Mariana Wolffenbuttel BA1, Marcela dos Santos Delabary MSc1, Ana Paula J. Zanardi MSc1, Elren Passos-Monteiro PhD2, Flávia Gomes Martinez PhD1, Leonardo Alexandre Peyré-Tartaruga PhD1

1Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 2Universidade Federal do Pará, Castanhal, Brazil

 

Description: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and to compare the effects of dance and Nordic walking program on flexibility and strength in Parkinson’s disease.

 


 

Systematic review of dance as treatment for chronic pain

Release Date:

September 21, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Benjamin Hickman, Alycia Fong Yan PhD, Fereshteh Pourkazemi PhD, Roxanna Pebdani PhD, Claire Hiller PhD, PT

Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

 

Description: Chronic pain has become increasingly prevalent with global estimates of 20-25% of people experiencing chronic pain in their lifetime (IASP,2004). Dance therapy has the potential to address pain using a biopsychosocial framework. However, there has been minimal research exploring dance as chronic pain treatment. This review aims to investigate the effect of any dance type on chronic pain of any origin.

 


​*Credit Designation Statement - CME Outfitters, LLC designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Length: 40 minutes

CME/CEU credits: 0.75

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Sweet music: How taste may improve dance performance

Release Date:

September 28, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Guest Speaker: Russel Best PhD1,2

1Centre for Sports Science and Human Performance, Wintec, Hamilton, New Zealand; 2School of Health and Social Care, Teesside University, Middlesbrough, United Kingdom

 

Description: Taste is a homeostatic function that conveys valuable information such as energy content, or toxicity of foods. Taste is not limited to the mouth and has the potential to affect and interact with multiple physiological systems, such as the brain, the gastrointestinal tract and muscles. In this presentation, the potential performance-enhancing mechanisms of sweet, bitter, hot and cold tastes administered prior to and during exercise performance are examined. Carbohydrate mouth rinsing is shown to affect perceptions of energy availability; quinine and caffeine rinsing has also been shown to improve short duration, power performance – although ingestion of bitter tastants is seemingly required to enhance performance. Hot and cold tastes may prove beneficial in circumstances where athletes’ thermal state may be challenged. Effectiveness is not limited to taste alone, extending to dedicated receptors throughout the digestive tract, relaying signals pertaining to energy availability and temperature to appropriate neural centres. 

 


Does the presence of scoliosis increase the risk of dance injury in adolescent recreational dancers? 

Release Date:

September 28, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Arnold Wong BPhysio, PhD1, Kenney Lau BSc, MSc1, Olivia Fung BA, MA1, Dino Samartzis BSc, DSc2, Cliffton Chan BPhysio, PhD3, Claire Hiller PhD, PT3, Patrick Yung FRCS4, Brenton Surgenor BSc, MSc5, Veronika Schoeb Bphysio, PhD6

1Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong; 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Centre, Chicago, IL, United States; 3Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 4Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 5The Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts, Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 6School of Health Sciences, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland, Lausanne, Switzerland

 

Description: Adolescents with scoliosis may show proprioceptive deficits and poor balance control, which may hypothetically increase the risk of dance injury. While research has found that more dancers demonstrate scoliosis than non-dancers, there is a paucity of research that has explored the associations between the presence of scoliosis and dance injury in young recreational dancers. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the association between scoliosis and dance injury among adolescent recreational dancer.

 


Injury patterns over a three-year period in a professional ballet company: changes and trends

Release Date:

September 28, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Mai Katakura PhD, MD1,2, Nick Allen PhD3,4, Angela Keley PhD1, James Calder PhD, MD1,2 

1Imperial College London, United Kingdom; 2Fortius Clinic, London, United Kingdom; 3Birmingham Royal Ballet, Birmingham, United Kingdom; 4National Institute of Dance Medicine and Science, Birmingham, United Kingdom

 

Description: The purpose of this study is to analyse the epidemiological data, especially focusing on days absent due to injury in an elite-level professional ballet company over a 3-year period. The data was compared with the previous analysis from 10 years ago. Potential reasons for any changes and clarification of the problems will be discussed.

 


*Credit Designation Statement - CME Outfitters, LLC designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Length: 1 hour 20 minutes

CME/CEU credits: 1.25

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Context, complexity, bias and philosophy in performance medicine

Release Date:

October 5, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter:

Guest Speaker: Caroline Bolling PhD, PT1,2

1Health and Safety in Sports, IOC research center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 2Cirque du Soleil, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

 

Description: Complexity as a discipline has been applied in many different fields, from computational sciences to public health research. Applying complexity principles, like the systems thinking approach can help to understand the dynamic interrelations between, amongst others, physical, biological, ecological, technical, economic, and social aspects. Such an approach has already been successfully applied for the development of solutions regarding complex public health problems, such as tobacco control and obesity prevention. Also, in sports medicine, recent publications proposed that sports injuries are a ‘complex’ phenomenon and should be analyzed through the lenses of complexity.  Why dance injuries are not being considered complex? And how could we apply complexity to dance injury research? The complex context in which an injury happens needs to be explored. An injury involves a dancer who can be characterized by many individual features as well as multiple extra-individual factors related to injury occurrence, which have a specific culture, are regulated by a specific group and take place in a particular socio-economic setting in a specific country. A complex system has a large number of heterogeneous elements that interact with each other. These interactions produce an emergent effect that is different from the effects of the individual elements. This effect persists and adapts to changing circumstances. The traditional study designs and analytical tools applied mainly in dance research can’t explore complex systems. In this talk, I will guide you to the basic concepts of complexity, into the dynamic, and the emergent nature of a complex system and I will explore how complexity can help us to understand dance injuries with a new perspective.

 


Epidemiological headaches

Release Date:

October 5, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter:

Guest Speaker: Evert Verhagen PhD1

1Amsterdam UMC, Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

 

Description: We are constantly looking for ways to improve the performance of artists, while at the same time attempting to prevent or reduce the severity of injuries. The backbone of such efforts is a scientific evidence base that supports the practice. Where to a certain extent we can draw upon scientific literature from sports, the body of dance and artistic specific evidence is growing rapidly. Nonetheless, most initiatives taken in daily practice are still based on practical experience. You likely have your own pearls, and maybe you have considered to objectively establish their effectiveness. After all, in the contemporary data-driven world, gathering valid and reliable information from your artists has become accessible for most. However, did you consider the ethical aspects around data to be used for scientific purposes? These aspects go further than informed consent and protection of the privacy of your artists, e.g. having a sound hypothesis, avoid to excessively burden the subjects, freedom of participation, and withdrawal. Subsequently, when you publish your findings, or when you aim to bring available evidence to your practice, you should consider some key elements that limit the fidelity of published conclusions; confirmation bias, publication bias, reporting bias, and spin. In this presentation, examples will be used to highlight ethical and fidelity issues and to explain how to deal with them. 

 


Adapting research tools for addressing complex movement in dance: encouraging multi-disciplinary engagement in research questions

Release Date:

October 5, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter:

Margaret Wilson PhD

University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, United States

 

Description: The gold standard in dance and sport science research involves the utilization of validated, reliable tests to assess a specific capacity. Current research questions in dance science regarding technique or performance demands can be measured using tests that control for one variable or competency, and yet these tests may not address more complex demands of dance such as balance, strength through range of motion, or quick changes of direction. Batson (2010) modified the Star Excursion Balance Test (mSEBT) to test dancers’ balance in a conservatory program. Whereas the mSEBT did not prove to be a good test for testing balance in dancers, it prompted researchers to consider other ways of testing balance in dancers. The mSEBT test was revisited to determine if it might be evolved for testing more dynamic balance as well as for use in screening protocols as well as an assessment of a specific conditioning program. This presentation will introduce the mSEBT – a dance-like test which features standing on one leg and gesturing to 8 spokes in a circle around the body. This test can be set to music, cued to use different body parts, or be performed in a randomized order which could lead to use in other areas that range from biomechanics, Laban Movement Analysis or motor control, which can be combined with motion capture, force plate, physical screening criteria or movement preference profiles. Using a test in this way might bring multiple researchers to the analysis of the data. In this workshop presentation, the participants will be introduced to examples of how the mSEBT has been used to address different research questions and asked to come up with ideas for using this test (or other research tools they are familiar with) to address questions they have in their area of study. While acknowledging the original purpose of the test, the purpose of the presentation is to stimulate ideas and discussion about using and adapting a movement test to answer a research question. Secondarily, this approach invites researchers with different analytic abilities to organize around the use of one test to address the complexity of dance training.

 


*Credit Designation Statement: CME Outfitters, LLC designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Length: 30 minutes

CME/CEU credits: 0.5

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Strength training considerations and safety modifications to produce stronger and more powerful dancers

Release Date:

October 12, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter(s):

Emma Faulkner PT, DPT1, 2Rob West DPT2

1Atlanta Dance Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States; 2Decatur Hand and Physical Therapy Specialists, Decatur, GA, United States

 

Description: The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate safe weight training practices that can be utilized by the dancer, including the dancer with excess hypermobility either globally or in specific joints. Often dancers are discouraged from participating in weight training and resistance training due to false beliefs that it is unsafe, it will be a detriment to dancer performance or it will alter the physical aesthetic in a way that is undesired. Weight training as a method of cross-training and development of general physical preparedness is not inherently unsafe for dancers and will not alter aesthetics or performance in a detrimental manner when carried out properly. During this presentation participants will learn safe lifting techniques, modifications of lifts to protect hypermobile joints, and programming techniques that can be used by a dancer or dance medicine practitioner in creating and progressing a resistance training program throughout the dance season. Specialized equipment for joint stabilization and lifting technique modification can be used safely and efficiently to assist dancers in the performance of a strength training program. Safe lifting practices assist dancers with developing proper strength, motor control, proprioception, and power that is needed to be successful within their dance genre. By manipulating programming and setting appropriate goals, dancers will be able to improve physical capacity, improve or maintain their aesthetic, and improve overall performance. Dancers of all genres are athletes and can benefit from a weight training and resistance program to improve their dance performance.

 


*Credit Designation Statement - CME Outfitters, LLC designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the

Length: 1 hour 5 minutes

CME/CEU credits: 1.25

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Biomarker profiling and monitoring for the elite dancer

Release Date:

October 26, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter:

Guest Speaker: Charlie Pedlar PhD, FBASES

St Mary's University, Twickenham, London, United Kingdom

 

Description: The magnificent spectacle of dance performance is the positive outcome of considerable physical and mental outlay of effort from individual dancers. Indeed, dance disciplines are characterized by high volumes of work associated with rehearsal and performance schedules. In addition to high workloads, additional stressors are ubiquitous in dance including the potential for sleep loss due to night-time performances and aesthetic requirements leading to a propensity for relative energy deficiency. It is not surprising therefore that injury rates in dance are relatively high compared to data from professional sports. Biomarkers derived from blood, saliva, and urine have been used to profile and monitor athletes in several sports and although often dismissed for financial and practical reasons, they could have considerable value in the dance setting. This presentation will present the case for profiling and tracking biomarkers in dance, and discuss some of the common issues and challenges that, if ignored, can reduce the quality of, and corollary impact of, biomarker monitoring. These include the choice of biomarkers, the timing, and methods of sample collection, the interpretation of biomarker data via individualized adaptive ranges. The presentation is intended to provide useful practical considerations for biomarker profiling and monitoring in dance settings.

 


Does dehydration really impair performance?

Release Date:

October 26, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter:

Jasmine Challis, MRes, RD1, Meghan Brown, PhD, SENr2

1Freelance Registered Dietician, Reading, United Kingdom; 2Birmingham City University,  Mary's University, Twickenham, London, United Kingdom

 

 

Description: Physical exercise produces heat, which needs to be dissipated for the body to function optimally. This is primarily achieved by the evaporation of sweat, and if fluid and electrolytes are not replaced, this can lead to dehydration and the associated symptoms. Although research regarding fluid requirements for physical performance has been extensive since before the 1970s, anecdotally dance students do not receive consistent messages about the need to replace fluid losses. The purpose of this presentation is to explore recent evidence in the field of fluid requirements, fluid balance, and fluid replacement; and consequently, provide recommendations to participants. 

 


Protein for the dancer; considerations for plant-based diets

Release Date:

October 26, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter:

Meghan Brown PhD, SENr,1Jasmine Challis MRes, RD, Ann Brown PhD2

1Birmingham City University, School of Health Sciences, Department of Sport and Exercise, Birmingham, United Kingdom; 2University of Idaho, Department of Movement Sciences, College of Education, Health & Human Sciences, Moscow, ID, United States

 

Description: The purpose of this study is to consider the evidence surrounding protein requirements for active individuals and provide protein recommendations in order to support the health, performance, and recovery of dancers.

 


The biomechanical profile of professional dancers’ foot-ankle complex during multidirectional landings

Release Date:

October 26, 2020

Expiration Date:

September 15, 2021

Course Presenter:

Ana Morais Azevedo PhD, PT1, Raul Oliveira PhD, PT1,2, João R. Vaz PhD, PT2, Nelson Cortes PhD3
1R'Equilibri_us, Private Practice, Lisbon, Portugal; 2CIPER, Faculdade Motricidade Humana, Lisbon, Portugal; 3George Mason University, Manassas, VA, United States

 

Description: Dancers rely on the intricate foot-ankle complex while performing jump-landings. This structure has been modeled as one rigid segment providing scarce intersegmental biomechanical information. Therefore, the dancers’ foot-ankle biomechanics remains poorly understood. The purpose of our study was to investigate ankle kinematics using a single- and a three-segmented foot models; and the contribution of each foot-ankle joints, between professional dancers(PDs) and non-dancers(NDs) during multidirectional single-leg landings.

 


*Credit Designation Statement: CME Outfitters, LLC designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

 

Accreditation Statement & Credit Designation

CME Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providers of CME Outfitters, LLC, and the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science. CME Outfitters, LLC is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation Statement

CME Outfitters, LLC designates this enduring material for a maximum of 11 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Physical Therapists (USA)

Contact your state licensing board to find out individual requirements to transfer or convert AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ to CEUs.

Athletic Trainers (USA)

This activity can be submitted for Category D continuing education credits to the Board of Certification (BOC). No purchase is necessary for Athletic Trainers to claim Category D credit for their participation in this enduring material. Contact conference@iadms.org to receive a certification of attendance.